Sabahans Want MA63 Implemented; What Was Zahid Up To In Kota Marudu

2194

GIVING THE HUGUAN SIOU AND MAXIMUS ONGKILI A DRESSING DOWN IN PUBLIC WAS LIKE GIVING THE TWO PBS A BIG SLAP. ZAHID’S BEHAVIOUR ONLY CONFIRMS UMNO’S BULLY TACTICS

COMMENT: Now that the dust has settled somewhat, those in the BN camp can breathe a sigh of relief as a “crisis” had been averted.

It nearly caused a mutiny by PBS as some members had suggested that the party should fly its own flag this coming election. If we read that correctly, it was like saying PBS should leave the BN coalition and contest on its own.

The timing was poor.

How could Zahid Hamidi, the Umno deputy President and the caretaker deputy prime minister, even dared to suggest it in front of the Huguan Siau, Joseph Pairin and the acting President of PBS, Max Ongkili?

It was patronising and condescending of him to say it in public which only confirmed the ‘Big Brother’ dominant approach of Umno, no such thing as equal partnership in the coalition, very clear here.

Wetrom Bahanda, left, the Umno Kota Marudu chief has his eyes on the Matunggong seat, and Ahmad Zahid seemed to have backed him. But PBS are now about to let go.

Of course Zahid had his reasons; in the 2013 election, the Kota Marudu parliamentary seat was won narrowly by PBS with a small majority of 842 votes. And the Matunggong state seat was lost to a PKR candidate by 320 votes.

In view of this, Zahid had suggested that the Matunggong seat be “lent” to UMNO to contest.

Instead of supporting PBS to regain the seat, Zahid was in effect saying the seat was a lost cause even this time around.

Was he hitting the panic button?

With friends like that, you don’t need enemies.

The reaction from PBS was not unexpected, when Chief Minister, Musa Aman said the seat would remain with PBS, it defused the situation somewhat. Even if some people saw that as sweeping it under the carpet act as many PBS members are still seething with anger over the whole issue.

Initially it was all smiles as PBS leader came to listen to Ahmad Zahid, but expressions became glum as the caretaker deputy prime minister insulted Ongkili’s performance at GE13.

As they believed the “suggestion” as it was explained later would have been better if it was done behind closed doors.

By doing so openly, it was like giving the Huguan Siou and Max a big slap in the face.

The netizens were also livid with this lack of respect shown in their comments in the social media.

Some said the whole episode also highlighted how the KDM community are treated by Umno and the policies in place.

While Dr Mahathir, now the opposition Prime Minister designate, found it difficult to register his political party for obvious reasons, the KDM voters have the luxury of something like eight political parties to vote for, thus splitting their votes. Without a strong KDM party to provide the spine, Umno’s dominance here is assured as long as the Muslim Bumiputera voters are with them.

The community cannot to be blamed as their politicians are responsible for not getting their act together due to hubris and greed.

It was rather telling also that the other KDM parties in BN did not come out to support PBS openly in this public dressing down.

It took the opposition KDM parties like PCS and PAN to defend PBS and the dignity of the Huguan Siou, or whatever was left.

Parti Warisan Sabah which has been pushing the Bangsa Sabah agenda is a truly multi racial party. More than 2,000 Rungus natives joined the party at a gathering in Pitas on Saturday.

If the coming election results do not favour PBS, this could be the end of a party that once ruled Sabah. With Pairin unsure of contesting and Max finding it difficult to fill Pairin’ shoes, signs are not so good for PBS.

Could the Matunggong dressing down be the nail in its coffin as Umno too didn’t appear to have much faith either?

Of course if it happens, it won’t be the end of the KDM community; if assumption can be made that the next state government will be formed by Parti Warisan making the return of multicultural political platform last seen here during the Berjaya era as opposed to race based politics favoured by UMNO and imposed on Sabahans who by inclination and nature prefer the former; the community has a big role to play provided they have enough representatives.

Whether this will come to pass, we don’t have long to wait.

KDM voters should now consider “unite and rule” instead of “divide and rule” as the norm? No?

IN THE FIRST PLACE, IT IS A REAL MOCKERY MENTIONING MA63 IN THE MANIFESTO, DOWNGRADING AN INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENT. AND TO RUB SALT TO THE WOUND, THE WORD CONSENSUS WAS BROUGHT INTO THE PICTURE

English schools in Sabah?

The incumbent Kota Belud MP, Rahman Dahlan has been making the right noises about it and now it has become part of BN’s manifesto. There is no reason for him not to be happy.

Rahman Dahlan has been making his rounds in Sepanggar where he is tipped to be the BN-Umno candidate, replacing Jumat Idris who has been suspended by Umno. But what has he to say on MA63?

At this point in time, Sabahans who pay attention to politics just want to know how the BN would treat the Malaysia Agreement (MA63) as they are not too bothered with other promises.

Despite repeated undertakings by the care taker Prime Minister that Sabah’s rights would be returned, many were disappointed that MA63 was included in the BN manifesto.

And then there was the question of semantics where the word “consensus” was used in the manifesto with regards to MA63 which got people riled up unnecessarily.

People are not interested in the technicalities involved.

There was real consensus among the parties when MA63 was first mooted and finally signed, otherwise the country would not have come into being.

What consensus are we talking about this time – 50 years down the road?

In the first place, it is a real mockery mentioning MA63 in the manifesto, downgrading an international agreement.

The BN GE14 manifesto. On the MA63, it says a decision must be reached by consensus???

And to rub salt to the wound, the word consensus was brought into the picture.

It did not show there was genuine intention of returning our rights at all.

There is a new spin to it now to add to the conversation.

And people also don’t want more committees to waste time and talk about it.

Sabahans were looking for the word IMPLEMENTATION.

And it wasn’t there.

How could local State rights advocates like Anifah Aman and the state Government buy into this?

Maybe they know something we don’t.

Many people don’t see this as a step forward, instead it is seen a step backwards.